Pat Metheny

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Pat Metheny guitar equipment

Iohannes


Gibson ES-175


Pat Metheny used this Gibson ES-175 for almost 20 years. He uses light gauge flatwound D'Addario strings (high E=0.11). To get the dark tone he likes he turns the tone control almost completely off.
This Gibson was very popular amongst jazz musicians. Other jazz guitarists that used an ES-175: Wes Montgomery and Pat Martino in their early years, Joe Diorio, Jimmy Raney, Toots Thielemans, Joe Pass, Herb Ellis, Jim Hall and many more.





Ibanez PM1000


This is Pat Metheny's signature guitar model, made by Ibanez. He owns a couple of them (modified to his special needs). He started playing Ibanez when his Gibson became a bit too fragile to travel with. The guitar's got only one pickup, but it sounds louder and fatter than the Gibson ones. Pat likes the fact that the tone control is much more responsive: he doesn't have to turn it all the way down to get the sound he likes.

Gibson ES-175


Pat Metheny used this Gibson ES-175 for almost 20 years. He uses light gauge flatwound D'Addario strings (high E=0.11). To get the dark tone he likes he turns the tone control almost completely off.
This Gibson was very popular amongst jazz musicians. Other jazz guitarists that used an ES-175: Wes Montgomery and Pat Martino in their early years, Joe Diorio, Jimmy Raney, Toots Thielemans, Joe Pass, Herb Ellis, Jim Hall and many more.





Ibanez PM1000


This is Pat Metheny's signature guitar model, made by Ibanez. He owns a couple of them (modified to his special needs). He started playing Ibanez when his Gibson became a bit too fragile to travel with. The guitar's got only one pickup, but it sounds louder and fatter than the Gibson ones. Pat likes the fact that the tone control is much more responsive: he doesn't have to turn it all the way down to get the sound he likes. 
Posted: Aug 18, 2012 1:37 PM - Quote - Report!

Iohannes


The baritone guitar PAT METHENY played on One Quiet Night was built by Canadian luthier Linda Manzer . It has curly koa back and sides, a German spruce top and Sitka spruce braces, a mahogany neck, and ebony fingerboard, bridge, and peghead veneer. The body was built with Manzers ergonomic Wedge design, and the scale length is 73.5 cm. (about 29 inches). The frets are spaced a little farther apart than those on a standard acoustic guitar, Metheny says, and the strings are heavier. So it takes some getting used to. Onboard electronics include a Fishman Prefix preamp with an undersaddle Acoustic Matrix Natural I pickup. An Applied Microphone Technology condenser mic is mounted inside the guitar to a back brace. The gauges of the DAddario strings on Methenys baritonein a modified Nashville tuningare (high to low): .017, .026w, .016, .022, .056, .065. Baritones are often tuned a perfect fifth lower than standard (A D G C E A), and in traditional Nashville tuning, the third through sixth strings are pitched an octave higher than standard (using upper octave strings from a 12-string set). For Methenys modified Nashville tuning, only the third and fourth strings are pitched up an octave.

  The baritone guitar PAT METHENY played on One Quiet Night was built by Canadian luthier Linda Manzer . It has curly koa back and sides, a German spruce top and Sitka spruce braces, a mahogany neck, and ebony fingerboard, bridge, and peghead veneer. The body was built with Manzers ergonomic Wedge design, and the scale length is 73.5 cm. (about 29 inches). The frets are spaced a little farther apart than those on a standard acoustic guitar, Metheny says, and the strings are heavier. So it takes some getting used to. Onboard electronics include a Fishman Prefix preamp with an undersaddle Acoustic Matrix Natural I pickup. An Applied Microphone Technology condenser mic is mounted inside the guitar to a back brace. The gauges of the DAddario strings on Methenys baritonein a modified Nashville tuningare (high to low): .017, .026w, .016, .022, .056, .065. Baritones are often tuned a perfect fifth lower than standard (A D G C E A), and in traditional Nashville tuning, the third through sixth strings are pitched an octave higher than standard (using upper octave strings from a 12-string set). For Methenys modified Nashville tuning, only the third and fourth strings are pitched up an octave.
Posted: Aug 18, 2012 1:45 PM - Quote - Report!

Iohannes

ORIGIN

In 1984 Pat Metheny asked me to design and build a guitar with "as many strings as possible." The resulting collaboration was the Pikasso guitar. In 1992 I was asked by the late Scott Chinery to build a strictly acoustic version of Metheny's Pikasso. Thus, Pikasso II. This second Pikasso was recently on display at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts in a show called "Dangerous Curves".

INGREDIENTS

Indian Rosewood Back and Sides, German Spruce top, Mahogany Necks, Ebony fingerboards, bridges and face plates, Pau abalone decorative trim Boxwood, Rosewood, Abalone Rosette Brass insets for mounting on stand.

SPECIAL FEATURES

Four necks. Two sound holes. Two access doors; one on the upper player's side and one at the tail block (based on a panel door design by the brilliant -Abraham Wechter).

The "WEDGE" (TM 1984) is a special feature I designed specifically for this instrument. The body is tapered so that the side closest to the player is thinner than the side that rests on the players knee, thus leaning the top back towards the player for a more aerial view. This is also more comfortable under the player's arm. This feature is available as an option on all my flattop guitars. This instrument was outfitted with a complete state of the art piezo pickup system (designed and installed by Mark Herbert, Boston). This included a hexaphonic pickup on the 6 string section that allowed Metheny to access his Syclavier computersystem thus triggering any sound including sampled sounds. (Saxophone sampling can be heard on the song "Mob Job.") Two mounting holes on the treble side (knee side) are such that the guitar can be mounted on internal brass insets attaching to a stand, leaving hands free for playing or viewing. Brass side bridges were made by Linda and machinist Bruce West.

This instrument took 2 years to build (approximately 1000 hours), and when the 42 strings are tuned to concert pitch, the Pikasso is under approximately 1000 lbs pressure. It weighs 6.7 kg (14 3/4 lbs).
ORIGIN

In 1984 Pat Metheny asked me to design and build a guitar with "as many strings as possible." The resulting collaboration was the Pikasso guitar. In 1992 I was asked by the late Scott Chinery to build a strictly acoustic version of Metheny's Pikasso. Thus, Pikasso II. This second Pikasso was recently on display at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts in a show called "Dangerous Curves".

INGREDIENTS

Indian Rosewood Back and Sides, German Spruce top, Mahogany Necks, Ebony fingerboards, bridges and face plates, Pau abalone decorative trim Boxwood, Rosewood, Abalone Rosette Brass insets for mounting on stand.

SPECIAL FEATURES

Four necks. Two sound holes. Two access doors; one on the upper player's side and one at the tail block (based on a panel door design by the brilliant -Abraham Wechter).

The "WEDGE" (TM 1984) is a special feature I designed specifically for this instrument. The body is tapered so that the side closest to the player is thinner than the side that rests on the players knee, thus leaning the top back towards the player for a more aerial view. This is also more comfortable under the player's arm. This feature is available as an option on all my flattop guitars. This instrument was outfitted with a complete state of the art piezo pickup system (designed and installed by Mark Herbert, Boston). This included a hexaphonic pickup on the 6 string section that allowed Metheny to access his Syclavier computersystem thus triggering any sound including sampled sounds. (Saxophone sampling can be heard on the song "Mob Job.") Two mounting holes on the treble side (knee side) are such that the guitar can be mounted on internal brass insets attaching to a stand, leaving hands free for playing or viewing. Brass side bridges were made by Linda and machinist Bruce West.

This instrument took 2 years to build (approximately 1000 hours), and when the 42 strings are tuned to concert pitch, the Pikasso is under approximately 1000 lbs pressure. It weighs 6.7 kg (14 3/4 lbs).
Posted: Sep 17, 2012 4:55 PM - Quote - Report!
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