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Compass/Styles/Histo ry/Clutter thread

FretboardToAsh

As said in the title, this is what I've been working on, it's actually more that I thought. I'll eventually divide the stuff in several thread according to subject.

EVERYTHING YOU FIND GOES HERE!

No seriously, everything you find and you think can be of use, post a link. Or send it to my account in PM, even if you're not sure what to do with it. That includes typos, and everything you feel is off.

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Compass/Styles

Flamenco is not a style of one people, there have been many, many influences. Both from the east, north, south, and west as well later on. Granada, is one of the best sources when it comes to how and when these people came together. And to learn how and where Flamenco came into being. Granada lies in the South of Spain, and shows signs of having contact with civilizations since prehistoric times. The oldest sources of this, are coins made by the Turdulos, one of the most civilized Iberian tribes who made coins on which Granada appeared but was named Iliverir. Later on, the Phoenicians, Greeks and Carthagers appeared on the list as well. The Roman empire settled in Granada eventually, and the Holy Cecilius occupied the position of bishop there in the year 62. The Iberian Iliverir became the Roman Iliberis.

Supposedly, the yews

Around the 7th century, the Arabians who had settled

The gypsies, from

The compass, is generally the flesh and bones of Flamenco. It is the single part that gives Flamenco its feel, and what can get people aroused like no other style can.

You cannot play Flamenco and not be in compass, it is not Flamenco.

There are, apparently, about 48 different styles. And while I do not know them all by far, I will try to describe the several different styles and compass that they belong to. Ill also try to put a short description about every style. Id rather put every style in its own thread, but a short and sweet one like this might just work better. But, seeing as people have been nagging to me about it for ages and something like that just isnt going to happen for a while, well settle for this for now. Im putting every style in a separate post which I will edit along the way as I dont have everything here and need to dig back into my mountain of source material, or as we know it, my memory. Once its an appropriate amount on all I will eventually turn them into lessons with examples and how to put one together.

Compass can be divided in four families, there is the 4/4th family, the 3/4th family, there is libre, which follows no strict beat, and the best known one the 12/4th family.

Styles in the 12/4th (or 4*3/4th) family.

Soleares, also known as the mother of Flamenco. It is speculated that all the other styles were born from this one, though the Caa I Polo are known to be older. And the Siguiriyas is said to be older as well. Whichever is right, it dates back to and the similarities between the Soleares and the younger styles of Flamenco cannot be denied. The general feel of it, is a majestic slower tempo. And the loneliness that the name implies. It belong to the family of the 12 beat compass, thus making it a hard one to get the general feel of, let alone master it.

Accents in Soleares are placed on 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

The best way to divide this is in four bars of three beats each, and change the accents around. Pay attention and try to analyze how every compass and falseta is put together, and you will come to recognize the patterns.
As said in the title, this is what I've been working on, it's actually more that I thought. I'll eventually divide the stuff in several thread according to subject.

EVERYTHING YOU FIND GOES HERE!

No seriously, everything you find and you think can be of use, post a link. Or send it to my account in  PM, even if you're not sure what to do with it. That includes typos, and everything you feel is off.

-------------------------------------------------

Compass/Styles

Flamenco is not a style of one people, there have been many, many influences. Both from the east, north, south, and west as well later on. Granada, is one of the best sources when it comes to how and when these people came together. And to learn how and where Flamenco came into being. Granada lies in the South of Spain, and shows signs of having contact with civilizations since prehistoric times. The oldest sources of this, are coins made by the Turdulos, one of the most civilized Iberian tribes who made coins on which Granada appeared but was named Iliverir. Later on, the Phoenicians, Greeks and Carthagers appeared on the list as well. The Roman empire settled in Granada eventually, and the Holy Cecilius occupied the position of bishop there in the year 62. The Iberian Iliverir became the Roman Iliberis.

Supposedly, the yews

Around the 7th century, the Arabians who had settled

The gypsies, from

The compass, is generally the flesh and bones of Flamenco. It is the single part that gives Flamenco its feel, and what can get people aroused like no other style can.

You cannot play Flamenco and not be in compass, it is not Flamenco.

There are, apparently, about 48 different styles. And while I do not know them all by far, I will try to describe the several different styles and compass that they belong to. Ill also try to put a short description about every style. Id rather put every style in its own thread, but a short and sweet one like this might just work better. But, seeing as people have been nagging to me about it for ages and something like that just isnt going to happen for a while, well settle for this for now. Im putting every style in a separate post which I will edit along the way as I dont have everything here and need to dig back into my mountain of source material, or as we know it, my memory. Once its an appropriate amount on all I will eventually turn them into lessons with examples and how to put one together.

Compass can be divided in four families, there is the 4/4th family, the 3/4th family, there is libre, which follows no strict beat, and the best known one the 12/4th family.

Styles in the 12/4th (or 4*3/4th) family.

Soleares, also known as the mother of Flamenco. It is speculated that all the other styles were born from this one, though the Caa I Polo are known to be older. And the Siguiriyas is said to be older as well. Whichever is right, it dates back to and the similarities between the Soleares and the younger styles of Flamenco cannot be denied. The general feel of it, is a majestic slower tempo. And the loneliness that the name implies. It belong to the family of the 12 beat compass, thus making it a hard one to get the general feel of, let alone master it.

Accents in Soleares are placed on 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

The best way to divide this is in four bars of three beats each, and change the accents around. Pay attention and try to analyze how every compass and falseta is put together, and you will come to recognize the patterns.
Posted: Mar 9, 2010 9:03 PM - Quote - Report!

FretboardToAsh

Siguiriyas, one of the oldest styles of Flamenco, and one of the few true gypsy styles. If I remember correctly the original Siguiriyas was about a woman crying at the grave of her lover/husband/etc. Generally play in modo dorico, por medio. Or as we know it, A...

Accents in Siguiriyas are placed on 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
When we analyze the several falsetas and rhythm parts we have we see that the bars are best divided in two bars or 2 beats, followed by two bars of 3 beats, finishing off with one last bar of 2 beats. Odd, but when you play it youll see it works. The fact that every beat is at the first of the bar makes things easier as well.

Peteneras,

Allegrias,

Accents in Allegrias are placed on 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Bulerias,

Colombianas,

Styles in the 3/4th family.

Sevillanas,

Fandangos,

Styles in the 4/4th family.

Farruca, came to be after more influence from the people of northern spain, called Farrucos. It is a pure 4/4th tempo, and lends itself well for solo guitar performances. It used to be danced primarily by men, though these lines are blurred nowadays. Carmen Amaya, the (female)dancer whom Sabicas has accompanied for a long time, is said to have danced a great Farruca.

Tangos, not quite like the Argentinian Tango you may be familiar with. Though it is indeed 4/4th the core of it is by no means the same. The greatest s

Tientos, much like a Tangos. Not the same at all, a certain 'shuffle'-like flow to it. Rather than a straightforward 4/4th beat.

Rumba, imported from South-America.

Styles in the libre family.

Malagueas

Granainas

Tarantos/Tarantas,
Siguiriyas, one of the oldest styles of Flamenco, and one of the few true gypsy styles. If I remember correctly the original Siguiriyas was about a woman crying at the grave of her lover/husband/etc. Generally play in modo dorico, por medio. Or as we know it, A...

Accents in Siguiriyas are placed on 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
When we analyze the several falsetas and rhythm parts we have we see that the bars are best divided in two bars or 2 beats, followed by two bars of 3 beats, finishing off with one last bar of 2 beats. Odd, but when you play it youll see it works. The fact that every beat is at the first of the bar makes things easier as well.

Peteneras,

Allegrias,

Accents in Allegrias are placed on 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Bulerias,

Colombianas,

Styles in the 3/4th family.

Sevillanas,

Fandangos,

Styles in the 4/4th family.

Farruca, came to be after more influence from the people of northern spain, called Farrucos. It is a pure 4/4th tempo, and lends itself well for solo guitar performances. It used to be danced primarily by men, though these lines are blurred nowadays. Carmen Amaya, the (female)dancer whom Sabicas has accompanied for a long time, is said to have danced a great Farruca.

Tangos, not quite like the Argentinian Tango you may be familiar with. Though it is indeed 4/4th the core of it is by no means the same. The greatest s

Tientos, much like a Tangos. Not the same at all, a certain 'shuffle'-like flow to it. Rather than a straightforward 4/4th beat.

Rumba, imported from South-America. 

Styles in the libre family.

Malagueas

Granainas

Tarantos/Tarantas,
Posted: Mar 9, 2010 9:07 PM - Quote - Report!

Thepredster

Nice. I'm glad this is finally made. Isnt buleria the same as Soleares but starting on a strong beat?
I also noticed you left out rumba which isnt it just like
1 2(accent) 3 4(accent) very slow. Less then 90 bpm easily
Nice. I'm glad this is finally made. Isnt buleria the same as Soleares but starting on a strong beat? I also noticed you left out rumba which isnt it just like 1 2(accent) 3 4(accent) very slow. Less then 90 bpm easily
Posted: Mar 18, 2010 1:00 AM - Quote - Report!

FretboardToAsh

So good of you to mention, I missed that one yes. Even though Rumbas are generally frowned upon by purists it will still be included as it is still a style, and tends to be the foot in the door for flamenco when it comes to people who are interested.


The first post here has an explanation on the rhythm on Bulerias. Where you actually begin or end isnt too much of an issue in my experience, but the general feel of the style leans more towards starting the 12 beat sequence at 12 instead of 1.
So good of you to mention, I missed that one yes. Even though Rumbas are generally frowned upon by purists it will still be included as it is still a style, and tends to be the foot in the door for flamenco when it comes to people who are interested.


The first post here has an explanation on the rhythm on Bulerias. Where you actually begin or end isnt too much of an issue in my experience, but the general feel of the style leans more towards starting the 12 beat sequence at 12 instead of 1.
Posted: Mar 18, 2010 5:54 PM - Quote - Report!
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